Difference between revisions of "HSV"

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{{Header|HSV 02/22}}
{{Header|HSV 02/22}}
{{cdolors|HSV}}
{{colors|HSV}}
In the HSV color system, the '''value''' of a [[color]] is its '''brightness''', also known as '''luminance''', and ranges from 0 to 100%.
In the HSV color system, the '''value''' of a [[color]] is its '''brightness''', also known as '''luminance''', and ranges from 0 to 100%.


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Any color with a 0% value is black, and any color with a 100% value is white. In other words, in these two extreme points, the ''[[saturation]]'' and ''[[hue]]'' properties of the color become irrelevant: in darkness, any color appears as black. In the region between, the saturation determines how saturated (vs. grey) the color is, and the hue determines its position on the spectrum (e.g. red, yellow, green, blue).
Any color with a 0% value is black, and any color with a 100% value is white. In other words, in these two extreme points, the ''[[saturation]]'' and ''[[hue]]'' properties of the color become irrelevant: in darkness, any color appears as black. In the region between, the saturation determines how saturated (vs. grey) the color is, and the [[hue]] determines its position on the spectrum (e.g. red, yellow, green, blue).


One can think of the value property as mixing a color with black or white, respectively, to make it darker (i.e. to create a [[shade]]) or to make it lighter (i.e. to create a [[tint]]).
One can think of the value property as mixing a color with black or white, respectively, to make it darker (i.e. to create a [[shade]]) or to make it lighter (i.e. to create a [[tint]]).
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[[Category:Colors]]

Latest revision as of 03:37, 20 May 2022

HSV

In the HSV color system, the value of a color is its brightness, also known as luminance, and ranges from 0 to 100%.

Examples of different values of green:

                                                                   

Any color with a 0% value is black, and any color with a 100% value is white. In other words, in these two extreme points, the saturation and hue properties of the color become irrelevant: in darkness, any color appears as black. In the region between, the saturation determines how saturated (vs. grey) the color is, and the hue determines its position on the spectrum (e.g. red, yellow, green, blue).

One can think of the value property as mixing a color with black or white, respectively, to make it darker (i.e. to create a shade) or to make it lighter (i.e. to create a tint).

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